Federal Skilled Worker

One of the categories under the Express Entry program is the Federal Skilled Worker – FSWC (formerly known as the Federal Skilled Worker Program – FSWP). If you are a skilled worker with foreign work experience and are looking to immigrate permanently to Canada, you can apply via this Class.

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Federal Skilled Worker
FSWP
Federal Skilled Worker
Every year, Canada welcomes thousands of immigrants who are looking to settle in the country. One of the top programs to become a Canadian permanent resident is the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC) which allows you to enter Canada’s workforce.
Federal Skilled Worker

One of the categories under the Express Entry program is the Federal Skilled Worker – FSWC (formerly known as the Federal Skilled Worker Class Program – FSWP). If you are a skilled worker with foreign work experience and are looking to immigrate permanently to Canada, you can apply via this pathway.

What is the Federal Skilled Worker Class?

The Federal Skilled Worker (FSW) program is one of the programs aligned within Canada’s Express Entry system for processing PR applications. Express Entry programs are highly competitive and used Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) to rank applicants

Who Can Apply For PR Through The Canadian Experience Class?

To be eligible, you must meet the minimum requirements under this Class:

  • Skilled work experience
  • Language ability
  • Education

This requirement expect that you have worked in (1) of these National Occupational Classification (NOC) job groups:

  • Managerial jobs (skill type 0)
  • Professional jobs (skill level A)
  • Technical jobs and skilled trades (skill level B)

For any of these NOC job groups, there would be an occupational description with a lead statement.  You must prove that through your work experience that you have performed all the essential duties and most of the main duties listed in the lead statement.

Your skilled work experience must be:

  • in the same type of job (have the same NOC) as the job you want to use for your immigration application (primary occupation).
  • within the last consecutive 10 years.
  • paid work ( Volunteer work or unpaid internships do not count).
  • at least 1 year of continuous work or 1,560 hours total (30 hours per week).
    • full-time at 1 or more jobs: 30 hours/week for 12 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours).
    • equal amount in part-time: 15-29 hours/week for 24 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours).
  • You must complete language tests in English or French for:
    • writing, reading, listening, speaking
  • You must earn a minimum score of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7 in all 4 abilities

It is important for you to ensure that your score is valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.  Your Language tests are valid for (2) years after the date of the test result.

Whether you studied in Canada or abroad there are certain criteria to be met.

  • If you went to school in Canada, you must have a certificate, diploma, or degree from a Canadian: secondary (high school) or post-secondary school (college, university, trades school)
  • If you completed your education abroad, you must have:
    • a completed credential
    • an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report from an approved agency that shows that your education is equivalent to a completed certificate, diploma, or degree from a Canadian secondary (high school) or post-secondary school.
How is the selection score calculated?

Once ALL  the minimum requirements are met, your application will be assessed based on: 

  • age
  • education
  • work experience
  • a valid job offer
  • English and/or French language skills
  • adaptability (how well you’re likely to settle here)

A 100-point grid is used to assess eligibility for the Federal Skilled Worker Class. You earn points based on how well you do in each of the 6 factors.  The current pass mark is 67 points.

You will get points for this factor based on your age on the day your application is received.

AgePoints
Under 180
18-3512
3611
3710
389
398
407
416
425
434
443
452
461
47 and older0

Education points are awarded based on an assessment of your educational credentials. For any foreign-obtained credentials, this assessment will include a determination of the equivalent to that credential if it were obtained in Canada.

You will be  awarded  under the Education Factor on the following basis:

Level of EducationPoints (25 max)
Doctoral (PhD) level25 points
Master’s level or professional degree. Occupation related to the degree must be:

  • NOC 2016 Skill Level A, and
  • licensed by a provincial regulatory body

Also, Degree Class must be in one of the following academic disciplines: Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Dentistry, Podiatry, Optometry, Law, Chiropractic Medicine, or Pharmacy.

23 points
Two or more post-secondary credentials, one of which is a three-year or longer post-secondary credential22 points
Three-year or longer post-secondary credential21 points
Two-year post-secondary credential19 points
One-year post-secondary credential15 points
Secondary school/high school diploma5 points

Under this factor up to 15 points are awarded, based on the number of years of work experience.

You require at least 12 months of full-time skilled work experience (or the equivalent in part-time work), and points can be earned for up to six years of work experience. The work experience must be an occupation listed by the Government of Canada as having a 0, A, or B NOC code (National Occupational Classification).

Points will be awarded on the following basis:

ExperienceMaximum 15 points
1 year9
2-3 years11
4-5 years13
6 or more years15

You may earn a maximum of 15 points under this factor (‘Arranged Employment’) if a Canadian employer extends you an offer of full-time permanent employment in Canada.

If you meet one of the following conditions you may earn a maximum of 10 points under the Arranged Employment.

ScenariosPoints
If the applicant is currently working in Canada on a work permit,and
  • The work permit is valid both when applying and when the permanent resident visa is issued (or the applicant is allowed to work in Canada without a work permit when his or her visa is issued).
  • The work permit is based on a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada in an occupation listed under skill type 0 or skill level A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC).
  • The applicant is working for an employer named on his or her work permit.
  • That employer has made a valid job offer based on the applicant being accepted as a skilled worker.
10
If the applicant is currently working in Canada in a job that is LMIA-exempt because of the following:

  • an international agreement (such as, the North American Free Trade Agreement) or
  • significant benefit to Canadian interests or
  • a federal-provincial agreement
and
  • The work permit is valid both when applying and when the permanent resident visa is issued (or the applicant is allowed to work in Canada without a permit when the permanent resident visa is issued).
  • The applicant’s current employer has made a valid job offer based on the applicant being accepted as a skilled worker.
  • The applicant is currently working for the employer specified on his or her work permit.
  • The applicant has been working for that employer for at least 1 year, continuous full-time or part-time equivalent.
10
If the applicant does not hold a valid work permit and is not authorized to work in Canada.and
  • A prospective employer has made a valid permanent, full-time skilled job offer to the applicant; and
  • The offer of employment has received a positive LMIA
10
If the applicant holds a valid work permit or is otherwise authorized to work in Canada without a work permitand
  • The applicant is currently working in Canada in a job that is LMIA-exempt, but is not under an international, federal-provincial agreement or because of significant benefit to Canadian interests; and
  • A prospective employer other than the one the applicant is currently working for has a positive LMIA and has made a a valid job offer to the applicant based on that LMIA and on the applicant being accepted as a skilled worker.
10

In Canada, there are 2 official languages, English and French.  It is important that you are able to communicate in 1 or both languages that will help you in the Canadian job market.

You will have to complete an approved language test to prove your language level.  This will get you up to 28 points for your language skills (English, French).

Language levels are measured using the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) for English and Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens (NCLC) for French

A minimum of CLB 7 or NCLC 7 is required for 1 official language in all language areas (reading, writing, speaking, listening).  For you to get points for the second official language, you will need a minimum of CLB 5 or NCLC 5 in all language areas.

First official language (maximum 24 points)

Check the table below and add the points that match your skill level:

Points
First official languageSpeakingListeningReadingWriting
CLB level 9 or higher6666
CLB level 85555
CLB level 74444
Below CLB level 7Not eligible to applyNot eligible to applyNot eligible to applyNot eligible to apply

Second official language (maximum 4 points)

You can get 4 points only if you have a score of at least CLB 5 in each of the 4 language abilities.

Second official languagePoints
At least CLB 5 in all of the 4 abilities4
CLB 4 or less in any of the 4 abilities0
AdaptabilityMaximum 10 points
Your spouse or partner’s language level

Your spouse or common-law partner has a language level in either English or French at CLB 4 level or higher in all 4 language abilities (speaking, listening, reading and writing).

To get these points, you must submit your spouse or common-law partner’s test results from an approved agency when you apply. The language tests are valid for 2 years after the date of the test result. They must be valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.

5
Your past studies in Canada

You completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a Class at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week. You must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5
Your spouse or partner’s past studies in Canada

Your spouse or common-law partner completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a Class at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week, and your spouse or partner must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5
Your past work in Canada

You did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada:

  • In a job listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Levels A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC).
  • And, with a valid work permit, or while authorized to work in Canada.
10
Your spouse or common-law partner’s past work in Canada

Your spouse or partner did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada.

5
Arranged employment in Canada

You earned points for having arranged employment.

5
Relatives in Canada

You, or your spouse or common-law partner, have a relative who is:

  • living in Canada
  • 18 years or older and
  • a Canadian citizen or permanent resident

This relative must be a:

  • parent
  • grandparent
  • child
  • grandchild
  • your or your spouse’s sibling (child of your or your spouse’s parent)
  • your or your spouse’s aunt or uncle (by blood or marriage)
  • your or your spouse’s niece or nephew (grandchild of your or your spouse’s parent)
How Can one apply through the Federal Skilled Worker Class?

Now that you meet all the requirements for Federal Skilled Worker , you must submit a profile to the Express Entry pool. IRCC uses a different system to rank your profile once you are in the Express Entry pool.

If you receive an invitation to Apply (ITA) based on your score within the threshold, you need to:

  1. Get the application Package
  2. Pay for the fees
  3. Submit your application

The application package includes a guide and document checklist that will help guide you to filling the forms correctly. Ensure that you gather all the supporting information listed in the Document Checklist. You have 60 days to include all the forms, information, documents, signatures, language test results, and fees.

Here is what the fees you are paying will  include when applying through Federal Skilled Worker Class

  • processing fees for you and anyone you include on your application
  • the Right of Permanent Residence Fee (RPRF)
  • biometrics
  • third-party fees (medical exam, Police Certificates, Language Testing)

Here is a checklist to look at to ensure you have completed your application: 

  • all questions are answered
  • the application and all forms have been signed
  • Processing fees have been paid, and a copy of the receipt is attached to your application
  • all supporting documents are included
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